MD: When I was younger, I thought that as soon as you become a working actor you would suddenly have the nicest hair, be totally comfortable posing for pictures and generally enjoy being “put together” and it turns out none of that is true. I have always had and still have the rattiest hair, I hate having my picture taken, and I generally struggle with the public experience of being an actor. I refrain from talking about it too much because complaining about glamorous things is not easy to sympathize with, but I do think that ways in which we experience sexism and oppression in this industry are microcosmic examples of sexism in all industries. As one example, the way I feel getting ready for a premiere is like I’m taking part in a live-action Hotornot.com It’s similar to the way that there is an expectation for women to wear makeup at work or they’ll be deemed unprofessional.  I think I’ve always really struggled with dressing up or trying to present a completed, glamorous self because, it seems like there’s an implicit failure built into that.


“Complaining about glamorous things
is not easy to sympathize with,
but I do think that ways in which
we experience sexism and oppression
in this industry are microcosmic
examples of sexism in all industries.” 
— Mackenzie Davis

ST: When are you most happy? 

MD: When I’m driving across the country with someone I love. When I’m sitting by the fire in Vancouver and reading with my family. When I’m building something. Building a table fills me with unbelievable joy.

ST: How has working in film impacted your sense of community? Are you able to find like minded people in the ‘biz’ other than me?

MD: Its expanded, but slowly. When I first began working, I felt like my life just kept stopping and starting. Start a job, meet new people, leave those people. Go home, see your friends, leave your friends, start a job—that sort of thing. But now that I’ve been at it for a few years, there’s this arc towards building a community that happens without you realizing it, and you know the ones you like to keep close. Hence my moving five minutes away from you. 

ST: Why do you think we became friends after making Always Shine? Do you make friends with all your directors and hang out with them on the weekends?

MD: As you know, I have about seven friends, so I can’t take the last part of this question seriously. I think we became friends because we were talking about our experiences and our lives so openly when we first met. We started to work together and I admired what you did and how you did it so much so that it was enough for me to really pursue you as a friend. I also think you’re really funny and have a surprising library of Borscht Belt comedian impersonations ready to go at any given time. None of my other friends can do even one, so I needed to fill that slot. 

ST: I understand it was a lifelong dream of yours to be in a Blade Runner sequel. Now that dream has come true. Are there new opportunities and challenges you’re looking forward to tackling?

MD: Yes, but I always feel like it’s some sort of test when people ask me this and they’ll judge me for my answers. For not being ambitious enough or something. I’ll let you know when I know. Thanks for interviewing me. I love you.